Learning to Read and Write Kanji Tests

This is a post that covers 17 writing tests over all the kanji I've learned, 29-30 kanji per day.

The concept behind the big test is to test 30 kanji per day, excluding the one's I've already tested to get an idea of how many kanji I know. Since I learned 496 kanji, 30 kanji per day should result in 17 tests. Because I didn't have the optimization on the first three tests, there are a few repeated kanji in the first tests (五 具 典 所 語 高). It looks like 17 will still be the number of tests. Without the optimization I'd have to do a lot more tests. Since each test takes ~15-30 minutes (drawing kanji is difficult), this optimization is necessary (as more tests are done, the number of repetition per test grows).

I was really upset as I found that the rate of recall is close to 50%. While this is substantially lower rate than when I was learning rows and testing daily, I believe that it is accurate. You can see how many I don't try on -- because any attempt at drawing is a waste of time if I cannot draw the whole kanji.

Read more »

Learning to Read and Write Kanji Row 24

As with other posts in this series, this is the results of a test I took today, July 23rd, 2021.

kanji test row 24

姉 払 関 届 家 顔 残 語 守 有 住 探 例 留 団 作 背 思 師 阪 林 橋 力 普 詳

Read more »

悪政


May 19, 2010

Now that AltSci is back up and fewer a few serious XSS bugs, I thought I would show you some awesome things that AltSci has given you in the past few years. AltSci Language AI is perhaps the most interesting, with gems like "悪政" and "День Победы", you may learn a lot more than a language or two.

Tonight I hacked on something for work and for humanity. At the same time a person I know worked for me on another project that will not so much advance humanity so much as prove something quite simple. Who did more for the world, who had more fun, and who did the most work are pretty much immaterial but I wished that everyone in the world could enjoy a fraction of the satisfaction that a programmer does when they create a piece of code. A piece of code that can be open sourced and that helps others, even better.

Read more »

Twitter Language AI


May 12, 2009

Hooray!
The Twitter Language AI is ready to be used! How do you use it? Type a word into the input box, then click "Search". This will search Twitter for that word. It will return the last 15 results and histogram all the words it finds. This is very simple functionality, right? Why would someone want a histogram of words spoken on a topic? For one, market research. If you know the word that people associate with your brand or topic, you can market it using their words. Yowch, that's almost like advertising, isn't it? Yup. The actual original purpose for this was to learn foreign languages by translating the most common words first (similar to my Japanese Language AI). The second interesting thing to do with the Twitter Language AI is to click the "Graph" button. This will take the data in the left and graph it on the right as shown in the image. This is really interesting and useful for scientists who don't want to import the data into a spreadsheet just to graph it. It uses the Google Visualization API and sends no data to Google (just your IP address and HTTP headers) to draw this, which is pretty cool.

Twitter Language AI 0.3 Russian and Brazilian Portuguese
Click the image above to use the Twitter Language AI.

Read more »